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James Hegarty
(Abt 1851-1898)
Minnie W. Shannon
(1854-1894)
Michael Mette
(1852-1929)
Anna Kearns
(1852-1917)
James Herbert Hegarty
(1877-1929)
Lillian Mette
(1880-1924)

James Harold Hegarty I
(1901-1991)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
Helen Catherine Moroney

James Harold Hegarty I 1,330

  • Born: 22 Jul 1901, Chicago, Cook, IL, USA 1,41
  • Marriage: Helen Catherine Moroney on 2 Aug 1922 in Chicago, Illinois 151
  • Died: 15 Apr 1991, Wheaton, DuPage, IL, USA at age 89 1
  • Buried: 1991, Mt. Hope Cemetery, Cook County, IL 105
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bullet  General Notes:

Identified at the Museum of American Trucking as a Pioneer of Trucking. Employed by Mack Trucks (3300 Wentworth, Chicago) for 49 years and by Kenworth Trucks for 12 years.
Much loved as the father-in-law of Richard Perry Radcliffe. His birth certificate mis-spelled his last name as Hagertey, although it spells his father's Hegerty. Father shown as of Irish descent, mother shown as of German descent.

Residing at 516 East 26th St., Chicago. Probably also lived at 2608 S. Lowe, according to some photo identifications in his handwriting, showing him as a boy of about 11 years old. Attended the Twenty-sixth Street Mennonite Mission church at 720 W. 26th St. along with his Uncle Bill and the whole family except for his father. The future Helen Hegarty also attended there. May have lived at 6416 S.Washtenau Ave. Lived at 3520 West 62nd Place in Chicago -- a home he and wife Helen purchased on July 5, 1927. They paid $5,000 for the house. At the time, they had one child and another on the way. Also lived at 10642 S. Talman Ave., Chicago. That house, which he had built, has shutters with the cutouts of bells through at least the 1980's. (3 bedrooms - 1 down - 2 full baths, breakfast room, jalousie porch, side drive, garage, $6,500 new, with purchase date of 1-17-1950, sold 4-4-1956.) Also lived for many years at 460 Brookwood Dr., Olympia Fields, IL, beginning 4-1956, --a home which he had built. Spent his final two years at 1729 Driving Park Road, Wheaton. That house has since been torn down and replaced. He and Grandma were members for many decades of the Olympia Fields Country Club. Membership number 18. A member of the Home Guards during WW1. Also a member of the Order of The Builders for Boys in 1921 , chartered by the Central Council at Chicago. This was a group associated with the Scottish Rite for boys between ages 14 and 21. They had to be sons of members of the masons. The purpose of the organization was to "aid in advancing their mental, moral, physical and spiritual up-bringing and development."
Also a member of Lawn Lodge No. 815, A.F. & A.M. Scottish Rite Bodies Valley of Chicago, Medinah Temple A.A.O.N.M.S.
A wonderful grandfather in all respects. We (Becky & Ellen Radcliffe) lived with him and Grandma five days a week for four years when we were very young. After that, he remained very active in our lives because he lived down the street from us. One nice thing he did for me (E.Woods) was teach me how to drive. Right after I got my license, I ripped the trim off the garage door with the rear view mirror. He came over, cut out the broken parts, and primed and painted the replacement part before Dad got home from work in the evening. Dad saw it immediately, but I didn't get into any trouble as I remember it.
I (EW) found the following notes I took during a conversation with Grandpa at our house probably in the 1980's: Grandpa's grandparents (Lillian Mette's parents) came from Baltimore, where they got off the ship. He didn't know much about his father, James Herbert Hegarty. Grandpa said he had a paper dated from the turn of the century, introducing his father. He thought he may have been an orphan, and hence, the introduction. There was some connection to Rochester, NY but Grandpa couldn't remember what exactly. James Herbert got a job at a general store in Chicago where he met his future wife. He drove a two-horse team for Omaha meat packer. [See more notes about James Herbert Hegarty under his name.] Grandpa's mother's sister's husband introduced James Harold and Helen Catherine. On dates, they would go to the silent movies. They dated two years. Grandpa remembered his name was spelled "Ogarty" on his father's immigration papers. [A fact which conflicts with the above information.] Grandpa didn't graduate from high school. In school one day, he got called to the office. There had been a phone call from his mother, telling him to come home right away, his father needed an operation. He never returned to school, even to empty out his desk, where he remembered he'd left a sandwich. (He told that story many times over the years and laughed about that sandwich in his desk each time.) After that, a neighbor got him a job paying $5/week. Mack Truck sent him back to school for a two-year course in bookkeeping through a night school program. He was age 14 when he left public school. Grandpa also worked for Swift Co. as a messenger since there were no office phones. There, he got two weeks vacation at their summer farm where they cut their ice -- a place called Fish Lake in Indiana. [http://www.alco.org/communities/fish_lake/] They could buy a bowl of soup and a glass of milk for 1 cent. He described himself as a fall-through-the-crack, laid back kid. Gram, during the conversation, countered that by saying he was a pampered kid with three doting aunts, being an only child. Grandpa was too young for WWI and too old (45) for WWII. He said he was in the Illinois National Guard Reserves. (End of notes)
Grandpa worked for Mack Truck for many, many years and retired from there in 1968 because Mack had a mandatory retirement age. He stayed retired only a short time and decided that wasn't the life for him. He needed to work to be happy so he went to work for a Mr. Rafferty at Kenworth Trucks. (I remember him saying once that in the morning, during his period of retirement, he'd pray that God would give him a purpose for his day. Once or twice that purpose was to bring me home sick from school.) He stayed on at Kenworth for as long as his health would allow and was quite happy. Mr. Rafferty was a good man.
I remember Grandpa telling us he'd been born in a room above a bakery, and his mother suffered under the heat. The year 1901 was a record-beating hot weather summer in Chicago, starting in June when the temperatures hit 93 and began a month-long series of heat waves marked by suicides, heat "prostrations" and weather-related insanity cases. The temperatures hit 102 on July 10, the highest ever recorded in the city at the time. The record was again broken the day before Grandpa was born, with 103 degrees. That record stood for 33 years. Address of where he was born is listed as 516 E. 26th St., Chicago. He is listed as the 1st child of his mother.
In After Ten Years by A.M. Eash, it tells and shows by photograph that Grandpa Jim was in the Loyal Sons -- a group of young men who hold weekly meetings during the winter and maintain a regular Young Men's Bible Class. (p. 48) They also shoveled dirt in the excavation of the unfinished basement to make more room for the Day Nursery. They did the work in the evening and without any pay "except a good supper prepared by the Queen Esthers, a class of young women." You had to be a Sunday School member to be a Loyal Son. The work was required to be interesting and helpful, in the hopes that it would develop them and become a determining factor in the choice of their life work.


A tree was dedicated in his honor at the Morton Arboreteum.

Listed as "James Hagertey" on his birth cert. He was born in the family's home and was attended at birth by the midwife who attended so many other Mette births, Mrs. Mary Boehm who lived at 2575 Emerald Ave. He most often pronounced his last name as "Hagerty," but everyone else in the family pronounced it "Hegarty."

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bullet  Noted events in his life were:

Birth, 22 Jul 1901, 516 E. 26th St., Chicago. 92 Listed as James Hagertey in FamilySearch's "Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates."
Attended at birth by Mary Boehm, midwife, the same midwife used by many of the Mettes. Grandpa told of his birth above a bakery (a story, of course, passed down from his mother). I remember Grandpa telling us he'd been born in a room above a bakery, and his mother suffered under the heat. The year 1901 was a record-beating hot weather summer in Chicago, starting in June when the temperatures hit 93 and began a month-long series of heat waves marked by suicides, heat "prostrations" and weather-related insanity cases. The temperatures hit 102 on July 10, the highest ever recorded in the city at the time. The record was again broken the day before Grandpa was born, with 103 degrees. At street level, 118 degrees were recorded. That record stood for 33 years. Address of where he was born is listed as 516 E. 26th St., Chicago. He is listed as the 1st child of his mother.
The 516 E. 26th St. address was changed when the city instituted a new numbering system in 1909. The current address for the building, according to the Chicago Public Library's research, is 630 W. 26th St. In the 1928 reverse directory, that was the location of W.A. (Edna A.) Kramer's bakery. (Kramer is a German name; James' mother was German, as was the midwife. But the area surrounding the bakery was turning Italian by 1928. That indicates to me that Kramer could have been a hold-out, a German who hadn't yet moved out of the area. Just a guess, though.) The Sanborn map (1905-1950 collection, volume 3, 1911, sheet 77) shows the bakery was right behind and a little kitty corner from All Saints RC Church & School. The building still stands and was built around 1891.
The Chgo Tribune reported 7-24-1916 about a William Gettman, a baker, being overcome with heat while working at Kramer's bakery located at 3434 N. Halsted. There was an Edward Kramer, a baker, in the 1885 city directory... no W. Kramer as a baker.
In Chicago Trib for this date, it lists 2 dead, 11 additional overcome by heat -- page 1. Also here is the mention of 118 degrees at street level. "In every part of the city the suffering was intense, but especially in the Ghetto, where children lay on the sidewalk and steps on the shady side of the street, panting, crying, moaning, while their elders, suffering with them, could do nothing for their relief. Suddenly, at 2 o'clock, over the Twelfth street viaduct and down into the plague spot came the lake breeze, swift and cool. It was like waking from a nightmare. But the lake breeze, after sending the thermometer tumbling 10 degrees in an hour and a quarter, dropped away, and, with a rush, the hot air came sweeping back from the Southwest Side, and the heat became more intense than ever." Another article from the Trib of the same day - "The janitor of one of the tall office buildings noticed drops of hot metal falling on the sidewalk in front of the building. It appeared to be bronze. He began an investigation and discoverd that the drops of hot metal fell from the figure of Mercury on top of the tower. Calling his assistant, he directed him to carry a huge piece of ice to the roof. He himself gathered together some towels and a bucket. The two men went to the roof and spent the remainder of the day putting cold cloths on the head and face of Mercury. After the sun went down it was found that the figure had been saved." "Before the heat was at its worst the Lake Street Elevated Railroad company was in trouble. The rails on the surface section of the line between Oak Park and Sixty-first avenues were warped by the burning rays, and in some places the rails spread as much as eighteen inches..." "Along with the high temperature came a water famine. All along South Halsted street and on the South Side generally the water supply was low. For a time it was impossible to get water above the second floor on South Halsted street.."

Religion: Mennonite, Abt 1911.

Residence: above a bakery : 516 E. 26th St., Chicago. 92 Or the way the handwriting goes, the address could have been 5110 E. 26th St. Considering that I don't think there was a 510 E. 26th, it could have been the 5110 number. It's unclear.

See the "Birth" event for the correct info here.

Residence: house: 2608 S. Lowe, Chicago.

Education: Graduated from grade school (?), 1915, Chicago, Cook , IL, USA. 8 Graduated from Mark Sheridan. "Vac't'd." date was 1905.

Residence: 6416 S. Washtenau, Chicago, Cook, IL. 87 Washtenau is one block west of Talman.

Residence, 3 Jan 1920, 3520 W. 62nd Pl., Chicago, Cook, IL. 14 Listed under James Haggerty. Living here are James, son James, and William Mette, Brother-in-law.

Marriage, 2 Aug 1922, 3920 Wallace Street, Chicago, Cook, IL. 96,331 See notes under marriage record.

Residence, 15 Aug 1927 to 1 May 1931, 7324 S. Green, Chicago, Cook, IL. 332 They began making payments of $60/month in September of 1927 and continued with the payments until March, 1930. At that time, the legal papers say "the parties of the second part are unable to continue the payments due and payable under said contract." They gave the sellers a quit-claim deed to the property and the sale was cancelled. Hegartys agreed to pay the light bill to May 1, 1931. The purchase price of the house was $17,000.

Residence: house, 1927 to 21 Dec 1948, 3520 W. 62nd St., Chicago. 333 Bought July 5, 1927 from his step-mother as part of the estate of his late father. First evidence of a telephone for JHH is in 1922. Their number was Republic 2669.
The house was a 1 1/2 story frame building on two lots (I think), hot water heated with a stoker attached, and had an automatic hot water heater. When sold, they agreed to leave behind the storm windows, venetian blinds and cabinets, the kitchen linoleum and the stair carpeting leading to the 2nd floor, and the 1 car frame garage in the rear. They sold it for $12,500 on 12-6-1948. (I have closing date of 12-21-1948. Could this have been the moving date?)
From 1930 census: Living here are James H., Helen C., James H Jr., and Clarabelle A. They owned the house and it was worth $9,000. (Second most expensive house on that page of the census.) Jim was an office clerk at an auto "plant" (?) They owned a radio. Listed as Jim having been married at age 21, Helen at 20.

Residence, 13 Apr 1940, 3520 W. 62nd Pl., Chicago, Cook, IL. 6 Living here are James Hegarty as head; wife Helen; children James Jr., and Belle.

Organizations: Masons. 1 Lawn Lodge No. 815, A.F. & A.M. Scottish Rite Bodies Valley of Chicago, Medinah Temple A.A.O.N.M.S.

Residence: house, From Jan 1949 to 4 Apr 1956, 10642 S. Talman, Chicago. 333,334 They paid $17, 761 to the contractors for the construction of their house. They may have moved in or else they closed on 1-3-1949. I also have something that says they lived here from 17 Jan 1950 to 1956. This is the house with the bell cut-outs on the shutters.

Residence, 30 Jul 1949, 10860 S. Church St., Chicago, Cook, IL. 157

Occupation: Mack Truck Salesman, 49 years, 3300 Wentworth Ave., Chicago, Cook, IL. 1 He was very highly thought of and worked there almost all his career. He was forced to retire in the mid-1970's. He was given a beautiful retirement party at a hotel downtown Chicago. He also was inducted into the Mack Truck Hall of Fame. I remember Grandpa (Jim) saying to me one day, "Hon, I got up today and asked the good Lord to give me something to do today, and this is what he gave me to do." That was in response to my having to call him to pick me up from school so I could go home sick. Retirement was not his thing.

Residence: 460 Brookwood Dr., Olympia Fields, Cook, IL, 4-1956 to 1980's, 1950's To 1980'S. 1

Residence: house, 4 Apr 1956-198 ?, 1729 Driving Park Rd., Wheaton, DuPage, IL. 333

Cemetery: Mt. Hope Cemetery: Chicago, Cook County, IL. 63 Buried with his parents and wife in Sec. 7, plot 235. Also buried near Herndon Benton.

Occupation: Kenworth Truck Salesman, from the 1970's to near the end of his life, 12 years. 1 There was a Mr. Rafferty who gave Jim a job at Kenworth. He was his boss. They got along famously, and Jim was very grateful to him for the opportunity to be doing something productive. Kenworth didn't have a mandatory retirement age, so Jim would go to work every day he could.

Alt. Name: James Hagerty.

Residence: 10860 S. Church St., Chicago, Cook, IL. 1 They lived in this bungalow's attic apartment while 10642 S. Talman was being built. WWII caused the housing shortage, so it took a long time for their house to be built. They lived at this address maybe two years.


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James married Helen Catherine Moroney, daughter of Michael P. Moroney and Elizabeth Bertha Bilek, on 2 Aug 1922 in Chicago, Illinois.151 (Helen Catherine Moroney was born on 12 Jul 1903 in Chicago, Cook, IL, USA,130 died on 10 Oct 2001 in Wheaton, DuPage, IL, USA 1 and was buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery, Cook County, IL, USA 1.)

bullet  Noted events in their marriage were:

Marriage, 2 Aug 1922, 2920 Wallace Street, Chicago, Cook, IL. 96 There was a notice published in The Temple Advocate "issued every Saturday by Immanuel Baptist Church, 2320 Michigan Ave., Chicago" of the wedding of Jim & Helen. It reads:
"A wedding of special interest to the young people of Immanuel church took place Wednesday evening, July 26th, in the Club Rooms. Mr. James H. Hegarty and Helen Moroney were united in marriage. About fifty of their intimate friends were present to witness the ceremony. The bride is a member of our church and one of the most popular of our young people. Immanuel will be deeply interested always in their new home." In addition, Belle Radcliffe owns a booklet entitled, "A Token of Our Wedding" in which is a certificate signed by all attendants and officiants. The address of Rev. Johnston Myers is listed as 2320 Michigan Ave. (He was the pastor of Immanuel Baptist Church, resigning in June of 1909. He resigned because of ideological differences associated with Unitarian theology being accepted by the Baptists. -- source: a Boston Evening Transcript of June 19, 1909. A photo of the reverend can be found online via the Chicago Daily News photos.

However, the wedding invitations say they were to be married on that Wed. evening at their home at 2920 Wallace St. This invitation & the Temple Advocate paper are in the possession of Belle Radcliffe. Check out photo of their marriage certificate in photo box above.


bullet  Marriage Notes:

There was a notice published in The Temple Advocate "issued every Saturday by Immanuel Baptist Church, 2320 Michigan Ave., Chicago" of the wedding of Jim & Helen. It reads:
"A wedding of special interest to the young people of Immanuel church took place Wednesday evening, July 26th, in the Club Rooms. Mr. James H. Hegarty and Helen Moroney were united in marriage. About fifty of their intimate friends were present to witness the ceremony. The bride is a member of our church and one of the most popular of our young people. Immanual will be deeply interested always in their new home."

This paper is in the posession of Belle Radcliffe.



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